Digital Literacy in Saskatchewan Science: A Curriculum Guide

It’s finally done!

It ended up being more of a companion to the science curriculum and the digital citizenship education guide. As I went through making this document and previously considered – digital literacy seemed the be the root theme of what I was supporting in the creation of the document. However, as I began creating my lesson plans – I learned that many of the other aspects of Ribble’s Nine Elements would be at work when actually trying to pursue the specific lessons in my classrooms (the only one I had a hard time working in was Digital Commerce).

responsible use and scientific use

A new visual I made incorporating responsible use with scientific use.

As I was working on it and considered my growth in science education that I experienced this year in part due to my work in ECI 842, I realized the importance I find in multiple perspectives in science as having significant value. This not only made me consider including the connections of implementing digital citizenship in science education to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action, but it also helped me dig deeper into the science curriculum itself.

In my last post I mentioned how in-depth the curriculum was, and how this helped me check my ambition of completely dissecting the curriculum and assigning connections in it to digital citizenship.

However!

I didn’t realize how well they had described what I think science is and should be in the aims and goals of the curriculum. This really made me question what all I missed as a biology minor rather than being a secondary science major in my undergraduate degree, because I originally planned these assignments around the thinking that some of my perspectives weren’t found in great depth in other science classrooms in Saskatchewan (they still might not be, but it is not because of the curriculum).

aims and goals

Aims and Goals via SK Biology 30 Curriculum

I tried to consider why I felt this way, and in talking with my fiance, we considered the idea that I don’t get to talk to very many other science educators except for the four(ish) in my high school – none of which specialize in Biology like I do, my cooperating teacher and predecessor retired, but without teaching the same courses at the same time, the dialogue regarding practices in the class may not have been as easily possible. It sounds like a convenient and cliche revelation to have at the end of the semester, but it really emphasized the need for me to begin following more biology, science-educating individuals in my personal learning network, and continue to take on interns in the future for the value in different perspectives available out there (shout out to Jesse Bazzul as well for suggesting I consider pursuing opportunities for exposure to new perspectives).

Ironically, the document I created has had the greatest impact on my own understandings and applications of science education to digital citizenship.

It is available for your perusal here: Digital Literacy in Saskatchewan Science A Curriculum Guide

I genuinely hope this document helps any science educators hoping to implement more digital citizenship in their classroom.

Thanks for a great semester to everyone in ECI 832.

– Logan Petlak

Advertisements

Scientific Literacy and Digital Citizenship Lessons

Tags

, , , , ,

As I worked on my resource for digital literacy in science classrooms, I soon learned that it would be very difficult to address the entire science curriculum. So I decided to focus on the foundations of scientific literacy and how they applied to digital citizenship.

I even felt so inclined as to make a visual for how Ribble’s Nine Elements fit into the scientifically literate student outline found in the curriculum.

digital citizenship in science.png

After making this revelation I was able to focus my efforts on creating a series of lesson plans to include at the conclusion of the document that include topics in Health Science 20, Environmental Science 20, and Biology 30.

I just completed the Health Science documentary last week and felt there was a lot of success and positive discussion among the students during and following the video – we’re extending the learning afterwords to look into other types of diets and the validity associated with them. I strongly recomme

My document is nearing it’s completion!

Logan Petlak

 

 

A Media Literate Rhapsody

Tags

, , , ,

There was some significant ideas that stood out throughout this semester:

  • It is beneficial to be digital residents, but you have to be educated on how to use it responsibly and proactively.
  • Our class is composed of a great diversity of educators that provide refreshing perspectives on many topics.
  • Being critical and skeptical are integral parts of life online and offline.
  • While we can educate students who belong to a particular generation, we have to be aware of the role of parents and everyone else in society who possess different worldviews and perspectives than what the students are educated on. Everyone needs education.
  • Literacy is what all teachers are trying to accomplish regardless of whether or not it is digital, media, or scientific literacy.

Thanks for a great semester everyone!
– Logan Petlak
My summary of learning video:


Lyrics:

Live critical lives,
In Digital reality.
Connected not alone
Online’s another part of me.
In ECI
We’re learning bout literacy
Old Facebook Logan, he was embarrassing
Because he didn’t ask, didn’t know.
Should I share? Should I post?
For science teachers though, maybe I will make policy
for literacy
Students, deconstruct this “fact”
Dig-Citizenship is what I want
It’s culturally significant.
Social, media and us are one.
But what about parents not in class todayyyy?
All of us, ooo
Can we all be digitally-wise?
To be digital residents for all tomorrows
Literallyyy everything, we consume matters.Oh hey, Ribble’s nine elements (“munts”)
Digital literacy emphasized?
Sharing anything seems like a crime.
Why didn’t anybody, fact-check this post?
Check your personal bias to find the truth.
Students, in my classroom (critically assess all news posts)
To truly live online
I’d be skeptical of everything I saw!

I made a comment on a post made by a man
He told me, he told me, I’m a liberal psycho!
He really just could not see, I’m helping soc-i-e-ty!
ALEC COUROS, ALEC COUROS
ALEC COUROS, ALEC COUROS
ALEC COUROS told me so – WORK WITH ME BRO
But fake news is all over the TV
It’s freaking everywhere, corrupting ideologies
Overcome this challenge fight cognitive ease!
Easy to, blindly follow, every single post
ARE CLAIMS VALID – What about this post?
(BOUT THIS POST)
WHY SAY THAT – What about this post? (BOUT THIS THOUGH)
NO I CAN’T – I will scroll past this post.
(ABOUT THIS THOUGH)

WON’T SCROLL PAST THIS POST (PAST THIS POST)
WILL SCROLL PAST THIS POST (PAST THIS POST)
HELP ME COUROS
PLEASE HELP ME AL-EC COUR-OS
OH MEDI-AH AH MEDI-AH AH MEDIA ACROSS THE GLOBE
MINING DATA IS A TERRIFYING THOUGHT TO ME
AND THEE
AND KITTIES

Teach responsible use in your teaching time!

Be proactive rather than reactive online
Oh Amy, thanks for computer commandments Amy!

Educate about, educate for all of these things.
Nice post – Nice post

Fellow EdTech classers
Glad you could teach me

All we’re really after, all we’re ever after is literacy. (Thank you Alec Couros).

One of an Infinite Means to Approach Science, Education, and the Universe: Part 4 – Science Education

Tags

, ,

What does all of this mean for science education (see Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3)? Is this a depth and understanding all educators should have – all students should have? How does it look to teach this in a classroom? What about the barriers and divides that exist between the practice of education in classrooms and the achievement of these learnings for all members of society? What of the shortfalls of the Western education system? Why do we sit in desks? Is it the best way we learn? Do we all learn different?

Despite it being paradoxical, if everyone was capable of embracing and recognizing these issues through lenses of kinship with nature, pluralism, multiple perspectives, and subjectivity this may allow us all to proceed towards a collective “good” as a mosaic of individuals belonging to different cultures and places. We could critically analyze oppressive structures that are a fundamental part of our society today and see how they influence our perspectives and worldviews.

If you’ve been reading these posts or watching the videos up until now, you should see the passion I have for science education – how it looks for me – what I value – my perspectives and worldviews. It’d be short-sighted of me to think this is the way, but as I’ve hopefully conveyed, it is one of infinite potential ways of approaching science education and nature. One interpretation of an “infinite” universe based on a finite, limited experience, and who knows I may watch this video years from now and not agree with things I’ve said in it – and I asked questions in the videos and throughout their production. In creating these videos, I considered not having my face in it – simply doing a voice-over, yet then, instead, felt it would humanize me more, allow us to connect more by making me appear more real or “mortal”. Yet the fact that this video now is found on a system and network of electrical wires and code perhaps makes me immortal, despite my finite existence as a remixed compilation of atoms, cells, and experiences. The human you observe here may be long gone, yet continues to be a part of our new, natural world that includes the digital realm.

These thoughts in these blog posts and all of these videos – the nature of science, perspectives, kinship… they’re all parts of what I think science education should be and make you feel inside or outside of a classroom (wherever you learn, which should be everywhere). It’s why science shouldn’t be something you feel you aren’t good at, it’s why science should make you feel that kinship with nature and the universe, it’s why you shouldn’t just like science and nature, you should love science and nature. I believe as science educators and students, this is how it happens, you model what loving the universe feels like and what questioning everything looks like. What you do with that feeling, whether it is support environmental policies or simply find your place in this universe, is up to you.

Thanks,

Logan Petlak.

One of an Infinite Means to Approach Science, Education, and the Universe: Part 3 – Life & Kinship

Tags

, , , ,

perspective.jpg

Perspective via A Life Less Ordinary

Perspectives are subject to change from individual to individual. Discussing my life is a relativistic idea that is entirely dependent on the angle you approach it – do I discuss the changes over time through generations of my family? Do I discuss the influences of my childhood experiences? Or do I discuss the forms of life that existed long before humanity emerged in Earth’s history? If that’s not enough, our definitions of life are constantly being redefined and we are always learning about how complex life on Earth is. That being said, we can still explore our understandings and definitions of life and how it can serve to connect multiple perspectives.

tumblr_lzbiewJvNT1qfsqzho1_1280.jpg

Earth’s Awesome Geological Timeline via Geologyin.com

When studying life, you may begin to appreciate the complexity of life that exists within organisms. The deeper you dig, you begin to see shared biological processes; whether it’s molecular similarities existing in unicellular bacteria shared with multicellular humans (like the enzymes that break down chemical compounds), the common repeating segments of nucleotides found in our genes and that of Protists, or behaviours existing in specific types of animals that provide more long-term care for offspring like that of homo sapiens (us).

Alas, even in our perception of the complexities of life, we still find ourselves relating it to how it connects with being human. We may fail to appreciate the perspectives of all aspects and parts of our universe. Spiritually, or creatively for some, we may consider the worldview of our air, the grass, an ocean; what is their story or narrative? Some of us may not be interested in that as it sounds too abstract, but the activity of challenging and considering multiple perspectives is paramount when approaching science. This approach lends itself to the idea of kinship with nature, and extending the idea of multiple ways of knowing and perceptions of nature to beyond the human experience. Some of us already do it for the non-human organisms we care for in our homes (examples being pets, like cats and dogs), but this idea seeks to extend this empathy to everything in nature: abiotic and biotic. It’s an ecocentric approach that places a value on everything in the natural environment – and even-so-far-as to use the phrase “natural environment” to be inclusive of the artificial creations of humanity.

Is this way of thinking right? We could argue, that competition and individualism is reflective of the idea of natural selection, and how survival of the fittest governs the changes of life over time; the strongest-suited to particular environment, in our case the strongest-suited to success in the Western world the environment is a class-based democratic, capitalist world (and success may be assessed in the form of wealth accumulation). This way of thinking could seek to keep us divided, or nepotistic. Yet I could instead argue the value cooperation and living harmoniously with nature has had on humans and our ancestors as a species over millennia. Having an attachment to, responsibility for, or sense of place and belonging in nature is a desire felt widely throughout many Canadian First Nations communities, and this kinship with nature was/is beneficial to success and happiness in certain contexts and environments. Even perspectives as a part of science were arrogant in nature and we can observe greater perspective and complexity as illustrated by Leroy Little Bear’s description of Blackfoot Metaphysics.

This isn’t meant to discredit the value of competition for promoting characteristics we’ve deemed valuable in society that may be realized through the sports we compete and choose to engage in. It’s a huge part of many of our experiences in the world today. These values are part of individuals within this broad idea of kinship and cooperation. Kinship and cooperation within our species places value on every thought and part of it.

It’s easy to think with this expansive definition of kinship that we are insignificant and, in a cosmic sense, we are, but your capacity to feel that emotion, and think that thought, is significant. What I do may hold little influence and value to the majority of humans, other organisms, and particles in nature. But my place in nature holds value for me, as it should for you – and through that lens of kinship holds value to the universe.

Logan Petlak


This post part 3 of a series of blog posts.

Read Part 1: Nature of Science
Read Part 2: Objectivity, Subjectivity, and Perspective
Read Part 4: Science Education

One of an Infinite Means to Approach Science, Education, and the Universe: Part 2 – Objectivity, Subjectivity, and Perspective

Tags

, , ,

A cornerstone of science, specifically the scientific method, is objective thinking. Objective thinking has become a hallmark of popular individuals in the media aligned within the scientific community, and the rationale for this is not without merit. Objectivity possesses positive applications, free of subjective and confirmation bias not only to aiding in the widening scientific understandings on contemporary issues like vaccinations and climate change which can bring about positive social change and ecojustice, but encourage productive interactions amongst peers: Being able to remove bias and emotions can be productive tools to resolve disputes when considering relationships within our species. But to disregard bias and emotion as detrimental parts of being isn’t prudent. It isn’t an inclusive approach to the full human experience and individual perspectives found within each of us and, as Derek Hodson points out, that inclusive aspect to approaching science may be critical part of learning for all individuals.

Before, I spoke of the importance of what the nature of science is and I made reference to the point that I merely hold one perspective or approach to it among many out there. The reality is that there is an incredible amount of cultural diversity on Earth, so acknowledging that my perspective is merely one from over 7.4 billion humans, is a critical part of acknowledging and being inclusive to that diversity through the idea of cultural pluralism. This, by extension, may even apply to functions of government in countries that in order to be truly inclusive, perhaps they should practice secularism which connects back to that idea of applying objectivity in a mass of differing perspectives; different subjectivities, narratives, and explanation for the complexities of the universe.

The idea of pluralism seeks to account for all these differing perspectives. In Canada, we have many individuals from different cultures and backgrounds existing in a diverse array of communities. This includes rural areas like Ituna, Saskatchewan, to urban centers like downtown Toronto, Ontario. The environment in which individuals interact shapes their perspectives and while we may find a shared identity for connectivity in Canada, what of the varying perspectives in other places around the world?

What of the perspectives we are exposed to in media? Different forms of media provoke the curiosities of science and questioning about the world we inhabit.

  • News posts, sometimes not completely accurately, convey information about new studies about the effects of coffee. Coffee drinkers may be inclined to shift their behaviour (sometimes negatively) based on their interpretation of this information.
  • Science fiction provides us with creative and imaginative perspectives beyond what we know in this world, yet even those forms of media are influenced by the perspectives and experiences of the author – yet they may connect us through mutual interests.
  • Listening to and observing comedians that we find funny due to their perspectives on life may connect us as well, or serve to divide us. George Carlin has a rant about national pride, and being proud of where you’re born not being plausible because you have no control over it – you didn’t earn it.

Yet a shared perspective and experience can bring members of a country together positively through a shared identity.

Or negatively, depending on your perspective.

We can look at the contexts in which perspectives propagate by observing our local communities and observe the importance of place on identity. These communities possess boundaries consistent with systems theory that outputs ideas and regularly gets new inputs of ideas. With social media contributing to greater amounts of globalization and the spread of ideas, however, the boundaries of perspectives are less static and even perspectives become positive feedback loops – spreading exponentially through communities.

positive and negative feedback loops.png

Positive and Negative Feedback Loops via Penn State University

Where do the boundaries of perspectives stop, though? Are there perspectives that hold more value to society or are there perspectives that are universally wrong? In certain parts of the world, gender and sexual diversity beyond heterosexual norms is a crime, which would be considered constitutionally wrong in Canada. In passing this kind of judgment, how does that impact the interpretation of our perspective by others? Does that make us less inclusive if we condemn certain policies and perspectives held by certain peoples in the world? Some would argue that’s the benefit of objective thinking – in transcends the potential flaws of subjectivity and diverse perspectives – but it may fail to fully encapsulate human thought, innovation and experience. Should we only account for perspectives held by certain, “worthy” peoples on the planet? Or, as we can see the immense diversity of perspectives in humanity, should we be extending our considerations beyond humanity?

Logan Petlak

One of an Infinite Means to Approach Science, Education, and the Universe: Part 1 – Nature of Science

Tags

, , , , ,

“I’m not good at science.”

“I don’t like science.”

“Science is too confusing.”

Throughout my life I’ve heard these phrases uttered by my peers and students, and the implication of these comments has always baffled me. I’d like to say it’s not solely because I love science and I would assume others would share my thoughts and experience (despite my best attempts to think beyond said experience), but I’d be wrong to think my experience isn’t always a factor. These negative phrases baffled me because of the wondrous, imaginative nature of science and our existence that seemed obvious to see upon making simple observations about our world. Yet, in analyzing these statements, it would only make sense to consider what factors influenced the individual to feel that way, at that given point in their life, when I interacted with them concerning science. Questions I’d have to consider include:

  • Did they have unenthusiastic science teachers (if so, why was the teacher unenthusiastic?)
  • What were there genetic factors programmed into their DNA that would make them more or less capable of achieving traditional success in their respective science classrooms?
  • What environmental factors contributed then and now to their thoughts and feelings on the subject of science? (And how am I defining “environmental factors”?)Do I speak literally of the chemicals and interactions the entire individual (including their cells) has been exposed to in the world around them from their days existing as separate gametes of ovum and sperm to the present?
    OR
    Do I critically look at the societal constructs that dictate how we (and they) live, behave and change culturally as a member of our species over time?

These are all considerations about the influences that affect the growth and development of an individual, and all of us as individuals. The contexts in which each of us learn vary significantly from one individual to the next, and the limitless depth in how we analyze these contexts is evident in the overwhelmingly numerous questions. None of these questions are easy to answer – much like any scientific questions.

Questions can baffle us, not knowing can make us feel lost, fear of failure can discourage us, but there’s so much we don’t know, questions we’ve yet to answer, and endless amounts of failure that are all at the heart of science.

What of the big, philosophical questions of science?

What does it mean to exist? What is being? Is our whole experience just a series of neuronal pathways learning and responding to our environment as a direct result of eons of mutation and subtle change?

Given what the evidence I’ve been exposed to indicates, I am inclined to think that all we are is a series of chemical reactions. Holding this worldview might seem like it is in direct contradiction to other worldviews – and for some it may appear as condescending or injurious. I don’t mean to diminish the value of others based on my perceptions of truth and place in the universe, or that because I hold this particular worldview that I will stop questioning and doubting my particular explanation – maybe I’m wrong, and that’s okay. I just hold that perspective about life.

But, then, how do we define life? In the Western world, are our Eurocentric definitions of life inclusive enough to consider the universe, as a whole, living? Is it wrong if it doesn’t? Is there “life” that exists out there that doesn’t subscribe to the way that carbon-based life exists on our planet?

These important philosophical, scientific questions – are never completely answerable – I’d almost go so far as to say that nothing ever is. Even the idea of “scientific proof” is loaded and misrepresented at times, as many scientists will say we are “more certain” of some things. Some of these questions we, collectively as a scientific community, may have a “pretty good idea of”. Some we have no clue, but, like anything, just because a question isn’t answerable doesn’t necessarily give every possibility validity.

Or does it?

When all of us are seeking our own source of truth and validation, how do we separate our subjectivities with being objective? Are we objective and critically competent enough to pursue and acknowledge what is likely truth or fact when it is presented to us?

All of these considerations lie in the nature of science – or my perception of it. Science is relishing the uncomfortable feeling of not knowing – yet feeling that desire to know more than you did before. Wanting to know everything about anything, always striving to become better, while knowing you’ll never achieve perfection or an absolute truth. Science shouldn’t be a negative force to justify division in our world, yet it can be used thusly. Science should attempt to constantly ask questions to educate us, rather than be used to belittle opinions and worldviews as it, too, is unfortunately used. Science occurs through individuals with different philosophies, it includes an evolving history transcending Homo sapiens and has subjectivities inextricably linked to its growth. Science is having curiosity and humility when analyzing and observing our specific place, at a specific point in time, in a specific, tiny corner of an ever-expanding universe.

petlak universe quote.jpg

As an educator, I want my students to love science.

To love not knowing.

To love asking questions about everything.

To consider every perspective.

 

Logan Petlak


Read the next blog post here:
One of an Infinite Means to Approach Science, Education, and the Universe: Part 2 – Subjectivity, Objectivity and Perspective

My critical, digital life.

Tags

, , ,

My critical, digital life.

I normally wake up and go on some form of social media (either Facebook or Instagram), and probably log a minimum of two hours on it per day. Side note: This, like many other people, is normally how I get my news.

I check sports highlights (Crosby, wow), 
friends’ activities and scroll through my feeds with the multitude of posts that people in my social network share parceled with advertisements specifically catered to my search histories and demographics I fill.

As I scroll through each post, I’m analyzing content consciously and unconsciously. Someone shares a politically-charged post about the latest Trump or Trudeau controversy, someone shares a post about the legalization of marijuana, or someone tags me (and it’s usually my fiancé) in a funny cat video or meme.

All the while there I am, looking at my electronically-powered, 5.1-inch screen of my phone, consuming and questioning in some combination, if not all, of the following (reflective of my video on Fake News):

  • Is this post valid or accurate? (Is it making claims that just aren’t true or promote opinion as fact?)
  • Why did they share that? (Was it funny? Intentionally offensive? For others’ benefit?)
  • Would I ever share that? (Yes? No? Did I ever? Why would/wouldn’t I now?)
  • What caused them to think that way? (What is causing me to think this way about it?)
  • Do they see how biased the source and article is? (Do they even care about that?)
  • Did they look into that claim before sharing? (Will I bother to look into it?)
  • Do they know that has no validity to it? (Do I actually know enough about this topic to provide validity?)
  • Why do I think that’s funny? (Is it something I agree with? Am I right in laughing about it?)
  • Why do I find that inappropriate? (Am I right in thinking so?)
  • Should I say anything about this? (Why should/would I?)
  • What do I do about this post?

After some combination of these thoughts and questions go through my head, it becomes a decision based on the final underlined questions. What do I do about this post? Like, share, comment, or ignore? Even more simplified, it’s ultimately one of two thoughts:

1. I’ll just scroll past.

OR

2. I can’t just scroll past this.

In the event I select option 2., a series of follow-up considerations will occur depending on the content of the piece, for the sake of this post – our exemplar content can be any of the following, all legitimate posts from people in my social network, several of which I felt “I can’t just scroll past this… I have to comment”:

Exhibit A and Exhibit B

Exhibit C

Does it convey “fake news”, and what specifically about this post is “fake news”? Does it misinform people and who are the people who can see it? What message does it send? What about it specifically do I feel compelled to discuss?

And the big question, if one of my students shared this, would I address it and how would I address it if this was the case? Address it that way, because we are all learners:

  • Respect, be positive towards the individual and have empathy for the individual – treating them as a learner.
  • Find common ground on this topic.
  • Address the specific issue of the content of the post.
  • Avoid getting emotional in your response or in reading theirs.

After making a post/comment, follow-up reflective questions surface:

Do I like what I posted? Could I have done better? Did I word it right? Will they understand what I’m trying to say? Will they listen to me? What if they don’t? Is it pointless to comment, then? What about the people who don’t comment, don’t like, but see it and consume it but leave no visible trace of acknowledgement for me? Am I doing a service to them?

My comments have been met with likes and dislikes.

Sometimes I’ve received insults. Other times the original person who shared the post doesn’t comment or their comment is strictly defensive and not open to what I have to say (maybe the way I wrote it was offensive?).

Kristin and Cats Instagram

This is what daily social media consumption looks like for me in the worst-case scenario. Best-case scenario, I see pictures like this (my fiancé and two of our cats).

But best-case or worst-case, all scenarios are part of the deal.

How do you consume online?

Have you found yourself exposed to similar posts on your social media feed? What did or do you do?

Comment and let me know!

– Logan Petlak

Can we ever be “fully literate” in all dimensions of literacy?

Tags

, , , , ,

Am I “fully literate”?

Is anyone?

As evidenced on my page, I believe we are all lifelong learners, so is it even a fair question to consider the notion that there exists a specific point in literacy that we officially “hit” and are considered “fully literate”?

Probably not, the idea of literacy seems too subjective.

Indicators exist in certain subject-areas that would serve as evidence to infer literacy-attainment, so in that sense we can create benchmarks for literacy. But when considering the ever-shifting development of subjects and or expanding knowledge on learning, benchmarks today may shift tomorrow. What is the next benchmark or desired milestone associated with grades and subjects?

Being literate today is a tall order (inadvertently implying that it was necessarily any easier at different points in history). I feel like becoming fully literate today has become synonymous with wisdom, utilitarianism and benevolence (or maybe that’s just my view on it). But you’d think the wise would know that you can never be fully literate (this is me thinking that I’m wise).

Literacy seems almost synonymous with learning (you have to learn to be literate). If you’re capable of continuous learning, consuming information, and improving in all dimensions of literacy (or perceived important ones of today), with certain benchmarks, maybe that’s the way!

BUT WHAT ABOUT PEOPLE WITH BARRIERS TO LEARNING AND INFORMATION CONSUMPTION?! IS THE SAME BENCHMARK OF “FULL LITERACY” STILL A SPECIFIC GOAL DESIRED?! HOW DOES “FULL LITERACY” APPLY THEN?!

science 10 scientific literacy.jpg

A Scientifically Literate Student via SK Curriculum

This brings me back to my post about media literacy and, as Carter also said in his vlog, it is needed. And to me, social and media literacy almost seems to transcend specific subject literacies. But then I think of how important scientific literacy is and how passionate I am about it (so much so that I’m making a resource for it an media literacy) – and how that, too, is needed for citizens today. Yet it needs to be delivered in a non-Eurocentric way which requires some cultural literacy.

Aside: these are great considerations for the development of my science resource.

The considerations are making my head spin, though. We probably need some form of benchmark to provide students with skills to become “fully literate” in today’s society, yet don’t want to be so specific that it becomes constrictive or culturally-uniform (devoid of diversity). The reality is that there are many different forms of literacy that I haven’t listed yet that are important to the holistic growth of individuals (health and physical literacy, for example) and all need to be pursued when able. Especially when all of these forms of literacy depend on one another as an intricate web enhancing the impact of another.

digital_literacy_newest_copy.001.jpg

Literacies for the Digital Age via Educorp

If all forms of literacy are continuously pursued, beyond the benchmarks, we become the benevolent, wise, and “fully” (but not really, “fully”) literate. As educators we have to be pursuing this personally, regardless of the courses/subjects we instruct, to model this for our students as well.

Agree? Disagree?

Get at me!
– Logan Petlak

 

The Need for Media Literacy

Tags

, , , ,

Media literacy is an integral part of learning.

Image result for media literacy

Global Competencies via AML

Many of the “to do’s” of media literacy, as evidenced in vlog posts by Dani and Luke are pretty straightforward and may occur in courses anyway without the deliberate classification as media literacy. Literacy in senior English includes media literacy in dissecting all elements of literature including the writer and content of the piece. History courses analyze the context in which historical events occurred much like we would analyze all the factors surrounding articles and posts.

I think that it is a very easy-to-realize goal of extending media literacy (specifically in the digital realm) into many, if not all, subject-based classrooms. It seems like it would be the most relevant learning for students as well (at least in the environment in which I instruct, high school), which should increase engagement. I would hope that this is a trend that more and more educators seek to address in their classrooms, but how would I ever know that its occurring when I’m busy teaching? Prep time rarely gets used to observe other educators as many of us re trying to keep our head above water working on marking/prepping. This presents the necessity for it to be required/enforced at an administrative or divisional level. And this presents the question then: does every teacher need to do it then? Is it a part of teacher assessment and professional growth for us all as a profession? I’m biased, obviously, but I think it should be! Do you agree?

With this in mind, what currently is happening in my school regarding media literacy? How are we educating students about digital citizenship and media literacy?

ccicyclonenation

Screenshot of ccicyclonenation post on Instagram.

At Central Collegiate we have been fortunate that administration encourages opportunities for sharing and leadership as educators supporting one another with educational technology. In addition, individual teachers are encouraged to take “risks” and utilize social media as a means to build community at Central Collegiate.

Our school social media, differs from that of each of our educator’s social media posts, as its very much about the school, not personal (obviously). With different types of sharing occurring with each of us teachers, I think that diversity in types of sharing is reflective of the diversity present in schools and also illustrate that necessity for instruction and unpacking of the idea of media literacy for everyone (this extends to include other roles within the school including facilities, office/administrative positions, and support staff), does this become mandatory and assessed in the same way it occurs for educators?

It’s still kind of a grey area when considering personal media use as evidenced by our ECI 832 discussion with Patrick Maze. There are some obvious things to avoid, and there are some things that perhaps shouldn’t be posted, but are arguably okay depending on perspectives. This raises that learning and modelling digital responsibility (and ultimately, media literacy) as individuals working with students and youth. Would we be okay with a student sharing something like what we post? Are selfies okay? And is that wide range of subjectivity regarding “what’s okay” a good means to go forward, rather than a definitive line?

I’m not sure on these questions regarding the future of media literacy, but it is a big part of society and culture today that we all need to be educated on.